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Bedroom design ideas: Arranging furniture in a bedroom

Your bedroom is your personal sanctuary, and you want a space you can take pride in. Seeing that its components are quite a number of bulky furniture pieces, how do you make sure everything fits nicely and have optimum circulation as well?

 

Situation:

Three sides of your rectilinear room are taken up — windows on one wall, the bathroom access on the wall opposite and the bedroom door on another — but you must have a generous wardrobe.

Solution:

Place the bed in the centre of the room, creating a “walkway perimeter” around it and zoning the room according to function, such as dressing, study and sitting area. The full stretch of wall can be dedicated to your wardrobe. Ideally the bathroom door is nearby, so you can zone your dressing area. It helps to install a partition (as a headboard and divider) or place a dresser behind the bed, as well.


 

Situation:

You’ve got too many windows or they occupy full spans of walls (lucky you!), leaving hardly any blank walls to position furniture against.

Solution:

Since you probably should have the TV against a blank wall to avoid glare and have ease of wall-mounting, try positioning your bed against the windows. Install thick drapes to combat bright sunlight, and act as a backdrop for your bed. Ideally, locate the bed at one end, so you can keep the drapes open for the rest of the room.
Alternatively, you can have the bed against a blank wall, and install a custom-made cabinet partition to house the TV. This can also help zone space, such that you can have a study area on the other side.


 

Situation:

You’ve got a spacious but irregularly shaped bedroom, such as an L-shape.

Solution:

Let the shape dictate how it can be zoned. For an L-shape room, rather than position the bed in the corner of the “L” (or middle point of the room), take advantage of the “nooks” at both ends. Place the bed at one end for a more intimate sleeping area, and the dressing area — possibly creating a walk-in wardrobe — at the other. You can place a sitting area in the centre portion, to connect the two separate zones.


 

Situation:

You have a small room. (The biggest problem, isn’t it?)

Solution:

A guideline is to try to keep the circulation to one side of the room. The goal is to get the three necessary accesses — the bedroom door, ensuite bathroom and wardrobe —grouped together. Even hotel rooms follow this, which is why they mostly have the same kind of layout where the entrance foyer, wardrobe and bathroom are near each other.

 

 

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